The Diary of an Immortal

The Diary of an Immortal ISBN: 9781483578620, an occult thriller e-book by David Castello.

Plot: Steven Ronson, an army medic who was engaged in almost constant conflict for 2 years and was with the group that liberated the Dachau German concentration camp in 1945, returned home to Florida to discover that his father was dying. Instead of suffering the expected long term, he kills himself. Steven leaves for New York where he excels as a Jazz musician partially as a result of a secret stash of pills he discovered at Dachau which purportedly had been made for Hitler so that he could live forever. During one performance, Albert, a former missionary, recognizes his performance as emanating from this source and informs him that the original formula came from China where one order of monks had lived for centuries with its use. Albert with his beautiful daughter Jennifer invites him to join them in a trip to China in the near future. They make the journey where Steven is introduced to the two thousand year old Chow Li and becomes involved in the chaotic period of politically based warfare during China’s movement into its communistic state and beyond. To provide further specifics would not be in the best interests of the prospective reader. Suffice it to say that the story contains many intriguing threads and ends quite differently from what most readers would be prone to expect.

Discussion: The author has exhibited an interesting knowledge of WW II and not only the Nazis’ unbelievably ‘sick’ activity but also the purported extensiveness of their associated activity; China’s revolution and Mao Tse-tung (Mao Zedong) as well as the part played by Chiang Kai shek with American aide; the Peoples’ Liberation Army; the background of Japanese influence; Tibet’s problems; the ancient city of Sian at the end of the legendary ‘Silk Road’; the ancient Bon Religion, exorcists, shamans, high-priests and the many faces of magic and of the occult. This really is a remarkable collection of seemingly individual items of fact and fiction woven together into an action packed thriller. The single regrettable factor, at least for this reader, is a somewhat uneven presentation that makes one want to ‘skip over’ some sections. It is most regrettable as it slightly ‘spoils’ an otherwise beautifully devised story based upon abundant knowledge of the ancient as well as ’near’ past.

4* Intriguingly interwoven fact and fiction.

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